FILMING PEOPLE IS EASY

Au Revoir Taipei   Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?
Definitely Maybe 20 years

Definitely Maybe 20 years

Frank Miller’s Dark Night «

My favorite graphic novel of all time is still The Dark Knight Returns

NETFLIX

"Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?" is finally on Netflix now. I read some user reviews, and this may be one of my favorite use reviews of all time (not just cause they liked it):

Charming yet profound film. It is a contemporary fairy-tale-like story that deals with some heavy issues, but the light hearted touch makes the film not be maudlin but magical. It’s a effervescent comedy about some very serious issues. The thing that makes the film extraordinary is that you care for every character, there are no villains, and the director and screenwriter make sure you understand and empathize with each character. You root for each character even though their problems don’t have an easy solution. The two story lines mirror each other. In one you have a girl who is IN love with a man but doesn’t really love him. The other you have a husband who loves his wife but isn’t IN love with her. The way each couple reconcile the difference between being IN love and simply loving is what makes the film so extraordinary.

I studied film at the University of Southern California for a very short time, but USC left me feeling like I didn’t have any talent. I really didn’t find their methods of teaching were that interesting or exciting. That lack of interest made me start to doubt myself and whether I had made the right choice. I simply said to myself, “Okay, I tried, but I didn’t make it.” I went back to my old job as an engineer… I found a job in Seattle designing computers [at the University of Washington], and started working from eight to five. By the time I was thirty, I felt so old…

One night, I was driving after work in downtown Seattle, and I saw a billboard outside a movie theater with the words, German New Wave, and the title, Aguirre: The Wrath of God. It made me curious, so I went in. I was fortunate. I came out a different person. That two hours just blew me away. It restored my sense of competence that I could be a filmmaker. This is what I thought a film should be. Film school would never teach you to make those kind of shots. That was one of the crucial moments of my life. I had turned thirty, I thought I was getting old, and three more years passed before I got the chance to work on a film project with a friend who asked me to write a script for him. I went back to Taipei, and also visited Hong Kong for the first time, and the film was shot in Japan. I got an offer to write and direct a made-for-TV movie in Taiwan, so I didn’t go back to Seattle. After ten years my mom was still calling and asking, “When are you coming back to your regular job?”

Edward Yang

(Source: strangewood)

"The original spark [for The Terrorizers] came from the Eurasian girl in the story, who at the time was just a drifter in Taipei. She didn’t have a job, came from a single-parent family. Her father was a Vietnam serviceman and her mother a bar hostess, so she comes from a very unique cultural background. In the film, I snuck in clues about her identity, like in the scenes when her mother is smoking, if you look closely you realize that she is using an army-issued cigarette lighter with a First Calvary insignia. What happened was that the Eurasian girl had a friend who told me about her interest in acting in films, so I met with her. She told me all kinds of stories about her life, like how her mother used to lock her up at home and, unable to go anywhere, she’d just stay in her room making prank phone calls. She told me that she had once called some woman and told her that she was her husband’s mistress. That story was the spark that lit the fire. It was such an explosive story. I started to think about how such a random, unrelated act could potentially create a terrible tragedy. Suddenly the whole structure of the story began to emerge.” — Edward Yang

"If the story was only about a terrorist and a couple, it’d be just about modern marriages. But Edward wanted more than that. He wanted to talk about the fear in the modern society. The fear and surreal feelings people have in the modern time. When Edward was making this film, he was a very angry man. He was angry with society and with what he had been through. He was extremely angry with the time. So the killings began in his films. We joked that he was killing more and more people with every movie. No one dies in the first film. In That Day on the Beach, only one person dies. Then in Taipei Story, a character is stabbed to death. Now, so many people die in The Terrorizers. More people die in his next film. There is a slaughter in A Brighter Summer Day. As a director Edward was very emotional when he was making the film.” — Hsiao Yeh, Screenwriter (The Terrorizers)

"Edward was a very honest director. I mean honest with his age and his time. He always expressed his views on society in his films. For example, in That Day on the Beach, we can see his doubt about marriage and love. He began to doubt things like that… When I saw The Terrorizers, it took my breath away. It was the first time I came to realize how talented Edward was. I knew from my talk with Edward that he was confused about love and everything around him. He had doubt about everything in Taiwanese society. He didn’t trust anything, anyone. Were they friends or enemies? What should a couple be like? He was in a confused state of mind. This film fully demonstrated his state of mind at that time.” — Wu Nien-jen, Screenwriter/Actor (That Day on the Beach, Yi Yi)

"I was very shocked. I felt when [Yang] came back from the U.S., he’d developed a unique eye for things. He viewed things differently from us. He studied in Taiwan until college, and left for the U.S. for ten years. When he returned, he became someone who came from a different world. Looking at where he grew up, he clearly saw the social structure of Taiwan… [The Terrorizers] seems direct, but it’s not. The underlying story tells the distorted relationships people had in the totalitarian era in Taiwan. Edward was very good at it. We understood his views on Taipei from Taipei Story. He had his viewpoint.” — Hou Hsiao-hsien

(Source: strangewood)

Robin Williams: A brief encounter

Saddest (and most well-written) thing I’ve read on Robin Williams

Now one of my favorite shows of all time. I watch season 1 over and over.

Now one of my favorite shows of all time. I watch season 1 over and over.

Okaaaaay

Okaaaaay

This was so good I wish I watched it 3 years ago so I could have thought about it more for the last 3 years

This was so good I wish I watched it 3 years ago so I could have thought about it more for the last 3 years

The Befores…

(Source: ewanmcgregored, via organorigami)

organorigami:

need a pair.

organorigami:

need a pair.

(Source: lostateminor)

unexplained-events:

Photos by Philipp Igumnov.

(via jillchien)