FILMING PEOPLE IS EASY

Au Revoir Taipei   Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?

"Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall."

— F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby)

(Source: , via organorigami)

organorigami:

Drawings from Beginners (2010) dir. Mike Mills

(Source: euo)

youmightfindyourself:

The abandoned city of Keelung in Taiwan. I’ve been reading about it all morning…pretty fascinating.

has anyone been here?

youmightfindyourself:

The abandoned city of Keelung in Taiwan. I’ve been reading about it all morning…pretty fascinating.

has anyone been here?

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

The Brady Bunch meets the Jacksons, 1971

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

The Brady Bunch meets the Jacksons, 1971

youmightfindyourself:

David Byrne, shot by Annie Leibovitz
Instead of actually writing, I choose to make promotional artwork for the script I’m writing

Instead of actually writing, I choose to make promotional artwork for the script I’m writing

Reading this now. Only other Philip Roth I’ve ever read was American Pastoral, 12 years ago.

Reading this now. Only other Philip Roth I’ve ever read was American Pastoral, 12 years ago.

ronanfarrow:

Breaking: Penny from the Rescuers and @LenaDunham actually the same person.

Started watching Girls recently and have been enjoying it.

ronanfarrow:

Breaking: Penny from the Rescuers and @LenaDunham actually the same person.

Started watching Girls recently and have been enjoying it.

FIFTEEN

My friend Eugene asked me to list 15 movies (not necessarily my favorites), but the ones that have stuck with me or I think about most often:

Manhattan
Chungking Express
The Sound of Music
The Apartment
Punch Drunk Love
The Godfather
Before Sunset
Eat Drink Man Woman
Empire of the Sun
A Brighter Summer’s Day
Paris, Texas
Singin’ In the Rain
Ferris Bueller’s Day Off
Rushmore
Tokyo Story

julydogs:

Kohayagawa-ke no aki / The End of Summer (1961) Yasujirō Ozu

(via edwardyangg)

Definitely Maybe 20 years

Definitely Maybe 20 years

Frank Miller’s Dark Night «

My favorite graphic novel of all time is still The Dark Knight Returns

NETFLIX

"Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?" is finally on Netflix now. I read some user reviews, and this may be one of my favorite use reviews of all time (not just cause they liked it):

Charming yet profound film. It is a contemporary fairy-tale-like story that deals with some heavy issues, but the light hearted touch makes the film not be maudlin but magical. It’s a effervescent comedy about some very serious issues. The thing that makes the film extraordinary is that you care for every character, there are no villains, and the director and screenwriter make sure you understand and empathize with each character. You root for each character even though their problems don’t have an easy solution. The two story lines mirror each other. In one you have a girl who is IN love with a man but doesn’t really love him. The other you have a husband who loves his wife but isn’t IN love with her. The way each couple reconcile the difference between being IN love and simply loving is what makes the film so extraordinary.

I studied film at the University of Southern California for a very short time, but USC left me feeling like I didn’t have any talent. I really didn’t find their methods of teaching were that interesting or exciting. That lack of interest made me start to doubt myself and whether I had made the right choice. I simply said to myself, “Okay, I tried, but I didn’t make it.” I went back to my old job as an engineer… I found a job in Seattle designing computers [at the University of Washington], and started working from eight to five. By the time I was thirty, I felt so old…

One night, I was driving after work in downtown Seattle, and I saw a billboard outside a movie theater with the words, German New Wave, and the title, Aguirre: The Wrath of God. It made me curious, so I went in. I was fortunate. I came out a different person. That two hours just blew me away. It restored my sense of competence that I could be a filmmaker. This is what I thought a film should be. Film school would never teach you to make those kind of shots. That was one of the crucial moments of my life. I had turned thirty, I thought I was getting old, and three more years passed before I got the chance to work on a film project with a friend who asked me to write a script for him. I went back to Taipei, and also visited Hong Kong for the first time, and the film was shot in Japan. I got an offer to write and direct a made-for-TV movie in Taiwan, so I didn’t go back to Seattle. After ten years my mom was still calling and asking, “When are you coming back to your regular job?”

Edward Yang

(Source: strangewood)